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Huawei launches own operating system to replace Google’s Android

Huawei has rolled out its long-rumored Hongmeng operating system (OS), known as the HarmonyOS. The company says it can switch to the new system at any time, including on phones, if it is unable to use Android. The Chinese tech giant officially unveiled the new platform on Friday. The operating system can be used on various smart devices and will be launched on “smart screen products,” such as televisions, later this year. After the launch in China, the OS can become available on global markets, Huawei announced. While the company said that it currently prefers to power its smartphones with…

Hyundai launches car with a solar roof

Hyundai has launched its first car with a solar roof charging system in a bid to tackle range anxiety – that perennial problem faced by electric vehicles. Hyundai has launched its first car with a solar roof charging system in a bid to tackle range anxiety – that perennial problem faced by electric vehicles. The Hyundai to be fitted with the eco-friendly system will be the new Sonata saloon. The bad news is that Hyundai currently has no plans to sell this model to the European market, but in the coming years the South Korean company says it will roll…

A contract programmer faces 10 years in jail for inserting a ‘logic bomb’ into a spreadsheet that caused the company to keep rehiring him

We’ve heard of programmers who secretly automated their jobs, but here’s a darker tale of a contract programmer who tried to force his employer to be dependent on him. Now, he’s facing up to 10 years in prison, as well as a fine of up to $250,000. David Tinley, 62, pleaded guilty in federal court to a charge of intentional damage to a protected computer, the US Attorney’s Office of the Western District of Pennsylvania said in a press release. Tinley had been hired by a US unit of Siemens, the German-based tech conglomerate, to create custom automated spreadsheets. The…

Amazon Plows Into Real Estate Market With Realogy Pact To Transform Homebuying Process

Unhappy with its market share in the US real estate market, the largest online retailer in the world and global commercial monopolist, Amazon, announced a deal on Tuesday morning with the largest US residential real estate brokerage company, Realogy, in a strategy designed to boost sales for both. As CNBC reports, Realogy – whose stock soared 25% on the news – and Amazon will now offer TurnKey, a horizontally and vertically integrated program meant to streamline and optimize the home- and furniture-buying process, by taking potential homebuyers through the Amazon portal and connects them to a Realogy agent. Once they…

Elon Musk Is Making Implants to Link the Brain With a Smartphone

Elon Musk announced this week that he wants to insert Bluetooth-enabled implants into your brain. He claims the devices could repair motor function in people with injuries and enable telepathy. The CEO of SpaceX and Tesla said his Neuralink device will involve a tiny chip connected to 1,000 wires that measure one-tenth of a human hair. Musk said the chip features a USB-C port (which is the same adapter used by Apple’s Macbook) and uses Bluetooth to connect to a small computer worn over the ear and then to a smartphone. Commenting on the small size of the device, he…

Google Fined $11,000 For Non-Compliance With Russian Legislation

The measure comes in response to Google’s selective filtration of search results. Russian state telecom watchdog Roskomnadzor has earlier threatened to fine the tech giant, adding that all formal procedures will be enacted by the end of July. Google has been fined $11,000 over a breach of the Russian legislation by failing to exclude links to sites with illicit content from its search results, according to Roskomnadzor. The watchdog said that more than a third of the links from the unified registry of illicit content remains in the search results. “Monitoring activities have revealed that Google makes selective filtering of…

Facial Recognition: Why Facebook’s ‘Alt Text’ Feature Can be Abused by Spooks & Hackers

Facebook’s “automatic alternative text” feature silently implemented by the IT giant on its social media platforms may be used to track users and could potentially be abused by hackers and intelligence agencies, say cyber security experts, suggesting that EU authorities may roast the tech giant for violating the bloc’s data protection rules. Massive outage and loading problems have unexpectedly revealed that Facebook’s AI is adding a text description to every photo posted on its social media platforms, including Instagram. According to Facebook, this feature, called an “automatic alternative (alt) text” uses “object recognition technology to create a description of a…

How Google Legally Profits From Massive Fraud on Its Platform (and What You Can Do About It)

Google—the internet’s largest search destination—can legally profit from fraud on its platform and has little incentive to fix it. But this isn’t a problem easily solved by ethics or legal amendments because current circumstances make changing the status quo extremely difficult. Nevertheless, there’s still more that we all can do to mitigate fraud on the internet. Why Google Maps Has a Fraud Problem Google corners the search market with 63 percent of all queries on the web. You might’ve even expected that number to be higher given that Microsoft garners almost all of the rest and people have a genuine…

The FTC’s $5 billion fine for Facebook is so meaningless, it will likely leave Zuckerberg wondering what he can’t get away with

After the news on Friday that the Federal Trade Commission is close to finalizing a settlement with his company for a mere $5 billion, Zuckerberg has got to be feeling similarly untouchable. If, after all the privacy and security fiascos Facebook admitted to over the past two years — including, but not limited to, the Cambridge Analytica scandal — it gets off with such a small penalty, he’s got to think he probably could get away with murder. Of course, Zuckerberg’s felt he could act with impunity for years. When Harvard students uploaded photos and other personal information to his…

EU’s GPS satellites have been down for four days in mysterious outage

Galileo, the EU’s global navigation satellite system, has been down for four days, since July 11, following a mysterious outage. All Galileo satellites are still non-operational, at the time of writing. According to a service status page, 24 of the 26 Galileo satellites are listed as “not usable,” while the other two are listing a status of “testing,” which also means they’re not ready for real-world usage. The European GNSS Agency (GSA), the organization in charge of Galileo, has not published any information in regards to the root of the outage, which began four days ago, on Thursday, July 11.…

Don’t be fooled by Google’s fake privacy (don’t worry, we’re not)

Google recently generated a flurry of coverage about its supposed privacy pivot, including an op-ed in The New York Times by chief executive Sundar Pichai. “We feel privileged that billions of people trust products like Search, Chrome, Maps, and Android to help them every day,” Pichai wrote. It’s not that we necessarily trust Google. It’s that, as a near monopoly, we have no choice. In fact, the crisis of trust — after a year of data breaches and congressional appearances — has led all the major tech companies to launch public relations campaigns around privacy. This is a smokescreen to…

A prolific credit-card theft ring is scanning for unsecured “buckets” in Amazon’s cloud and has compromised 17,000 domains (so far)

Magecart is the hacker gang that pulled off the British Airways and Ticketmaster credit-card heists; now they’ve build an Amazon cloud scanner that systematically probes S3 storage “buckets” for configuration errors that allow them to overwrite any Javascript files they find with credit-card stealing malware. Security researchers Riskiq have identified 17,000 domains that they say Magecart has compromised this way, including 2,000 of “the world’s biggest sites.” It’s not clear how many of those actually have credit-card processing scripts that would allow Magecart to steal card details from their customers. Amazon S3 buckets are secure by default. Companies run into…

Apple disables Walkie Talkie app for Apple Watch over eavesdropping vulnerability

Apple has temporarily disabled the ‘Walkie Talkie’ iOS app for Apple Watch after a vulnerability was revealed that could allow a third party to eavesdrop on your iPhone. The app lets two users who accept invites from each other to send and receive audio chats by way of a ‘push to talk’ interface not unlike ‘PTT’ buttons on ’90s-era cellphones. Here’s Apple’s statement on the vulnerability and their decision to disable the app: We were just made aware of a vulnerability related to the Walkie-Talkie app on the Apple Watch and have disabled the function as we quickly fix the…

Dutch Company Reveals An Electric Car That Charges Itself With Sunlight

A Dutch company from Eindhoven has released a prototype car that has already sold 100 orders to be filled in 2011. What’s special about the car is that it is completely electric as well as solar powered. The prototype car actually won the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge, and it represents the world’s very first long-range solar car. It’s a four passenger vehicle and it’s called Lightyear One. According to the company, the car will get to a range of approximately 725 km, and 400 km in the winter at highway speeds with heating on. This is truly amazing, and it…

Vimeo is purging ALL vaccine awareness channels as part of coordinated tech censorship sweep

Not to be outdone by YouTube with its continued efforts to stifle online free speech, the competing video platform Vimeo has now begun to censor channels and pull content that expresses any type of skepticism about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines. Joining in on Big Tech’s anti-First Amendment fray, Vimeo recently announced that it will no longer allow people “to use our platform to spread hateful ideologies,” which to Vimeo includes: • Content that falsely claims that mass tragedies are hoaxes • Content that depicts or encourages self-harm • Content that perpetuates false or misleading claims about vaccine safety…

Facebook Put a Fatwa on PJW

Facebook is literally inciting its 2 billion users to break the law and incite violence against people Facebook doesn’t like. The same company that lectures us all day about the need to stop hate is directly encouraging violent hate. SOURCE: INFOWARS

Apple Cofounder Steve Wozniak’s Dire Warning: Delete Your Facebook Account Now!

Apple Cofounder Steve Wozniak deleted his Facebook account last year and is now telling anyone willing to listen to do the same before it’s too late. TMZ interviewed Wozniak at Reagan National Airport in D.C. last Friday and asked him if he’s troubled by Facebook, Instagram and other social media platforms infringing on his privacy. Woz responded by saying social platforms are eavesdropping on our private conversations, and sending personal data to advertisers. With the lack of privacy on social media, he said, most people should delete their accounts.  “There are many different kinds of people, and some the benefits…

OOPS: DNA-testing service exposed thousands of customer records online

DNA-testing service Vitagene Inc. left thousands of client health reports exposed online for years, the kind of incident that privacy advocates have warned about as gene testing has become increasingly popular. More than 3,000 user files remained accessible to the public on Amazon Web Services cloud-computer servers until July 1, when Vitagene was notified of the issue and shut down external access to the sensitive personal information, according to documents obtained by Bloomberg. The genealogy reports included customers’ full names alongside dates of birth and gene-based health information, such as their likelihood of developing certain medical conditions, a review of…

IBM closes $34 billion deal to buy Red Hat…

International Business Machines Corp (IBM.N) said on Tuesday it has closed its $34 billion acquisition of software company Red Hat Inc (RHT.N), as it looks to ramp up its cloud computing business. Underscoring the drive into high-margin businesses, IBM in October agreed to buy Red Hat, the company’s biggest acquisition in its more than 100-year history. Ginni Rometty, IBM chief executive since 2012, has steered the company toward faster-growing segments such as cloud, software and services and away from traditional hardware products, but not without a bumpy journey. The newer areas of focus have sometimes underwhelmed investors. In an interview,…

Instagram’s new solution against bullying: Artificial Intelligence, and ‘Restrict’

Instagram launched a new feature today, Restrict, intended to help vulnerable users avoid abuse. Facebook’s Head of Instagram Adam Mosseri says the company will also be focusing on new uses for AI to crack down on bullying. Social media platforms are under pressure by governments to show they can police themselves in matters that impact elections. In the spirit of showing they are responsible and don’t need a heavy regulatory hand, Instagram has declared war on bullying, and there’s quite a press launch to kick it off this week. “We are in a pivotal moment,” says Mosseri. “We want to…

Virgin Galactic To Go Public In $800 Million Deal

Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin are about to lose out on another important milestone to Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic: First space tourism company to go public. According to Reuters, Virgin is planning an IPO as part of a deal with a special purpose acquisition company created by Social Capital CEO Chamath Palihapitiya. SPAC’s typically have two years to raise money from investors and spend it to help take a company public. The SPAC will reportedly invest about $800 million for a 49% stake in Virgin Galactic, according to the Wall Street Journal. That includes about $100 million…

Report: Trump Did Not Invite Twitter And Facebook To Meeting On Big Tech’s Alleged Conservative Bias

President Donald Trump did not invite Facebook or Twitter to an upcoming social media summit in Washington, D.C., addressing big tech’s alleged conservative bias, CNN reported Sunday. Trump’s summit, scheduled for July 11, is mostly an opportunity for major conservative groups and pundits to vent their frustrations with Silicon Valley, the report notes, citing anonymous sources. Many conservatives and Republicans believe social media companies are suppressing their content. The White House refused to provide a comment to the Daily Caller News Foundation. Conservative groups Media Research Center and The Heritage Foundation are among those attending, according to representatives with both…

Brazil to add digital data protection to fundamental rights

The Brazilian Senate has approved a proposal to add protection of data in digital platforms to the list of fundamental rights and individual citizen guarantees set out in the country’s constitution. According to senator Simone Tebet, rapporteur of the proposal – which will now be voted by the lower house of the National Congress – the federal government should be responsible for legislation. She noted that adding the topic to the constitution demonstrates central government recognizes the importance of the topic. “State and society should be entitled, as a general rule, to knowledge about each other, as long as there…

Warning: free hotel wifi is a hacker’s dream

You’ve just arrived at the hotel after a delayed flight and a half-hour wrangle with the car-hire firm. And then you remember that you’ve forgotten to pay last month’s credit card bill, and there’ll be an interest charge if you wait until you’re back at base. But – hey! – you can do it online and help is at hand. The receptionist is welcoming and helpful. They have wifi and it’s free. Relieved, you ask for the password. “Oh, you don’t need one,” he replies. “Just type in your room number and click the box.” Phew! Problem solved. Er, not…

Top VPNs secretly owned by Chinese firms…

Almost a third (30%) of the world’s top virtual private network (VPN) providers are secretly owned by six Chinese companies, according to a study by privacy and security research firm VPNpro. The study shows that the top 97 VPNs are run by just 23 parent companies, many of which are based in countries with lax privacy laws. Six of these companies are based in China and collectively offer 29 VPN services, but in many cases, information on the parent company is hidden to consumers. Researchers at VPNpro have pieced together ownership information through company listings, geolocation data, the CVs of…

Google Maps down, sparking mass disorientation

The Google Maps server has gone offline in some parts of the world, and users are finding themselves utterly disoriented – or not finding themselves at all. Instead, they are reportedly shown “no results found” error messages. The app has been reported down in the US, Brazil, Peru, Mexico, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand and Australia, with both coasts of the US apparently hit the worst. Both the Chrome and Android versions of the app are not functional, according to the reports. Map of the problems experienced by Google ©  downdetector.com Over 1,000 people reported the problem to website Outage…

Facebook’s image outage reveals how the company’s AI tags your photos

Everyone knows the bit in The Matrix when Neo achieves digital messiah status and suddenly sees “reality” for what it really is: lines of trailing green code. Well, thanks to an outage currently affecting Facebook, users of the social network have been given a similar peek behind the digital curtain, with many images on the site now replaced with the tags they’ve been assigned by the company’s machine vision systems. So if you browse through your uploaded photos, instead of seeing holiday snaps or pictures of food and friends, you’ll be shown text saying things like “image may contain: people…

Slaves lose their mind as Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp go down for over EIGHT HOURS!

Services on Instagram, Facebook and WhatsApp remain down several hours into a worldwide outage affecting the entire ‘family of apps.’  Thousands of Instagram users have been unable to post to news feeds, see stories or load content since around 9 a.m. ET. Meanwhile Facebook users say they are having trouble logging in and accessing their feeds, as well as viewing or posting pictures.  WhatsApp is also failing to send or receive messages, as well as offering a poor connection. A number of users are also unable to log-in. The mass outage is likely to be linked as Facebook owns Instagram…

Frontier: if you don’t buy your router, we’ll charge you a rental fee; if you DO buy your router, we’ll charge you a “support” fee

Frontier bought out Verizon’s FIOS business in Texas, California, and Florida; some of Verizon’s (former) customers had shelled out $200 to buy their routers rather than endure the indignity of being charged a monthly rental fee by Verizon — but now, Frontier is charging them a rental fee even though they’re not renting a router. Frontier says that this is because supporting third-party hardware costs them so much that they have to charge a fee to recoup it. Rich Son of Texas has asked the FCC to intervene with Frontier, who started charging him $5/month when they took over from…

The complete list of alternatives to all Google products

This guide aims to be the most exhaustive resource available for documenting alternatives to Google products. It has become one of the most popular guides on Restore Privacy and is regularly updated with new information. – June 2019 update With growing concerns over online privacy and securing personal data, more people than ever are considering alternatives to Google products. After all, Google’s business model essentially revolves around data collection and advertisements, both of which infringe on your privacy. More data means better (targeted) ads and more revenue. The company pulled in over $116 billion in ad revenue last year alone…

ICANN eliminates .org domain price caps despite lopsided opposition

Earlier this year, ICANN sought public comment on a new contract for the Public Interest Registry, the non-profit organization that administers the .org top-level domain. The results were stark. More than 3,200 individuals and organizations submitted comments to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, and most of them focused on a proposal to remove a cap on the price customers could be charged for .org domains. The existing contract, signed in 2013, banned the Public Interest Registry from charging more than $8.25 per domain. It allowed annual price increases of no more than 10 percent. Registrars can add their own fees…

Google and Facebook are circling Africa with huge undersea cables to get millions online

The rapid growth in internet usage despite high cost of access and the expected population boom in Africa—already the youngest continent by age of its population—jointly represent a significant opportunity for some of the world’s largest tech firms who are betting big on facilitating internet infrastructure and, by extension, ensuring hundreds of millions of potential customers get online to use their services. With internet penetration rates on the continent estimated at an average of 24%, it remains the only continent where over half the total population is without internet access. Yet, that stat represents some significant improvement given internet connections…

BETA TEST: Cloudflare Issues Shut Down Millions of Websites….

Network services provider Cloudflare is down for the majority of its users, bringing services like Discord, Marketo, Down Detector and DigitalOcean offline. The full cause of the outage is unknown, with Cloudflare’s support page simply noting: “Cloudflare is observing network performance issues. Customers may be experiencing 502 errors while accessing sites on Cloudflare. “We are working to mitigate impact to Internet users in this region.” CEO Matthew Prince tweeted: “Aware of major Cloudflare issues impacting us network wide. Team is working on getting to the bottom of what’s going on. Will continue to update.” Update, 14:15 UTC: “Cloudflare has implemented…

Did Mark Zuckerberg Really Create Facebook?

An explosive letter alleged to be written by a Facebook insider who was Mark Zuckerberg’s lover from their freshman year at Harvard was hand-delivered to a member of the Anonymous Patriot’s Conclave a few days ago and published on their American Intelligence Media website (aim4truth.org). For those with any interest in knowing whether or not Mark Zuckerberg is really the boy-genius founder of Facebook and author of the essential computer source code that anchors today’s social media giants, calling this letter ‘explosive’ may even be an understatement. In terms of its authenticity, AIM said this as a preamble to the letter: American Intelligence Media has…

BULLSHIT: PRIVACY IS AN ILLUSION-The Govt. Wants to OUTLAW Encrypted Messaging in iMessage, WhatsApp, Signal, Wickr, Telegram, Etc.

If you ever use the encrypted messaging options on programs like iMessage, WhatsApp, Signal, Wickr, Telegram, or any other service, your time to discuss things privately over the phone may be running out. The US government doesn’t like for anything to get in the way of their ability to spy on investigate even the most mundane of conversations. Instead of seeing privacy as a right, they see it as suspicious. Your devices are already being searched at quadruple the previous rate in airports. And the attack on free speech is now going as far as our private messages to our…

Ebooks Purchased From Microsoft Will Be Deleted This Month Because You Don’t Really Own Anything Anymore

Anyone who bought ebooks through the Microsoft Store is in for a rude shock in the coming days. The good news? You can get a refund. The bad news? All of your books are going to be deleted this month. Microsoft announced in April that it would stop selling ebooks and that any books the company already sold would stop working in early July because the DRM servers were being shut off. Yes, you read that correctly. Those books that you “bought” are going to disappear. Even the “free” books that you downloaded through Microsoft will be deleted. Microsoft started…

Brave defies Google’s moves to cripple ad-blocking with new 69x faster Rust engine

Brave, the Chromium-based browser developed by Firefox co-founder and JavaScript creator Brendan Eich, thinks there’s a better way of handling ad-blockers than Google’s approach. Brave’s answer, which it argues massively improves browser performance, is found in Rust, the Mozilla-hatched programming language that was in part created by Eich.    As ZDNet reported in June, developers of Chromium-based browsers like Opera, Brave and Vivaldi, didn’t support Google’s plans to cripple ad-blockers outlined under its Manifest version 3 proposal.   Brave now claims to have delivered a “69x average improvement” in its ad-blocking tech using Rust in place of C++. The improvements…

22 awesome projects for Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi, a tiny, stripped-down $35 computer, hit the market in 2011 with the intention of helping promote basic computer science skills in schools. It has become the DIY gadget-maker’s go-to device. Tinkerers, hobbyists, educators and students — basically anyone who likes to build things — have taken to the Internet with project after project utilizing the Raspberry Pi. The little computer has controlled robots, reached the upper atmosphere in a weather balloon and become the building block for almost any gadget you can think of. It’s now in its fourth iteration, faster and more advanced than ever before. With…

How to use this $70 gadget to detect spy cameras in your Airbnb or hotel room

Numerous reports over the past several years have suggested Airbnb hosts are using cameras to spy on guests. Some hosts might have a relatively innocuous Nest Cam outside to keep track of who comes and goes, but others can be used to watch you while you roam about the house. There have even been reports of cameras in hotel rooms. Airbnb’s terms says it requires “hosts to disclose all security cameras and other recording devices in their listings, and we prohibit any security cameras and other recording devices that are in or that observe the interior of certain private spaces…

Google Chrome has devolved into nothing more than “surveillance software” that spies on its own users

Google Chrome may still be a popular choice for browsing the web, but there are better options — especially if you value privacy and freedom. A new review has revealed that Google Chrome is shamelessly spying on its users — and collecting data on them to build profiles of their likes, interests and personalities. This “surveillance software” used to be the stuff of dystopian fiction nightmares but is now our unfortunate reality. Geoffrey A. Fowler, a columnist for the Washington Post, took a deeper look at Google Chrome, and was shocked by what he found: It tracks everything — including…

Face-Reading AI Will Tell Police When Suspects Are Hiding Truth

American psychologist Paul Ekman’s research on facial expressions spawned a whole new career of human lie detectors more than four decades ago. Artificial intelligence could soon take their jobs. While the U.S. has pioneered the use of automated technologies to reveal the hidden emotions and reactions of suspects, the technique is still nascent and a whole flock of entrepreneurial ventures are working to make it more efficient and less prone to false signals. Facesoft, a U.K. start-up, says it has built a database of 300 million images of faces, some of which have been created by an AI system modeled…

Signs from above: Drone with projector successfully trolls car AI…If the cars and the drones ever band together against us, we’re in trouble.

After a recent demo using GNSS spoofing confused a Tesla, a researcher from Cyber@BGU reached out about an alternative bit of car tech foolery. The Cyber@GBU team recently demonstrated an exploit against a Mobileye 630 PRO Advanced Driver Assist System (ADAS) installed on a Renault Captur, and the exploit relies on a drone with a projector faking street signs. The Mobileye is a Level 0 system, which means it informs a human driver but does not automatically steer, brake, or accelerate the vehicle. This unfortunately limits the “wow factor” of Cyber@BGU’s exploit video—below, we can see the Mobileye incorrectly inform its driver…

GrubHub is buying up thousands of restaurant web addresses. That means Mom and Pop can’t own their slice of the internet

New York City restaurant owner Shivane M. says she was ready to leave GrubHub.  She owns two small locations in Brooklyn and Queens with her husband, where they serve classic American breakfast and lunch—egg sandwiches, burgers, fries. It’s a mom-and-pop shop, and they rely on phone orders for delivery to get through the slow winter months.  Shivane signed up to add both of her restaurants to GrubHub’s online delivery platform several years ago. Its services were promising: It would handle delivery orders and show her menu to new customers in exchange for a commission on each order placed through the…

Boeing’s 737 Max Software Outsourced to $9-an-Hour Engineers

It remains the mystery at the heart of Boeing Co.’s 737 Max crisis: how a company renowned for meticulous design made seemingly basic software mistakes leading to a pair of deadly crashes. Longtime Boeing engineers say the effort was complicated by a push to outsource work to lower-paid contractors. The Max software — plagued by issues that could keep the planes grounded months longer after U.S. regulators this week revealed a new flaw — was developed at a time Boeing was laying off experienced engineers and pressing suppliers to cut costs. Increasingly, the iconic American planemaker and its subcontractors have…

Pentagon has developed a laser that can identify subjects from hundreds of meters away based on their HEARTBEAT

U.S. special forces are taking a more ‘intimate’ approach to remotely identifying targets, using lasers to sense their heartbeat.   According to MIT Technology Review, the Pentagon has developed a prototype of the technology, code-named ‘Jetson,’ that uses infrared lasers to read a person’s cardiac signature. Though far less obvious than fingerprints or faces, people’s heartbeats have a distinct profile, making them among the most useful biometrics for uniquely identifying a person. What separates the signature from others like it, however, is the fact that unlike a face, which may bear many similar features to another, heartbeats are entirely distinct. As…

A DIY Internet Network Has Quietly Crept Into New York…With the installation of “Supernode 3,” NYC Mesh now covers large swaths of both Manhattan and Brooklyn

A community-run operation named NYC Mesh is on a mission: to deliver better, cheaper broadband service to New York City. The locally-run nonprofit project says it’s engaging in a dramatic expansion that should soon deliver a new, more open broadband alternative to big ISPs to a wider swath of the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. With the installation of a new “supernode,” NYC Mesh has greatly expanded its coverage area to much of western Brooklyn, as well as much of lower Manhattan. Like most cities, New York City suffers from a meaningful lack of broadband competition. The city’s biggest ISP,…

Tesla’s Head Of Auto Production Unexpectedly Quits

Tesla’s head of production in charge of all vehicle manufacturing at its Fremont factory, Peter Hochholdinger, has left the company, according to electrek.  Hochholdinger had come from Audi, where he was previously in charge of production for the Audi A4, A5 and Q5. At Audi, he oversaw more than 400,000 cars being built annually. Tesla touted his hire in 2016, sending out a press release at the time and saying they were “excited” to have him join the team. He was widely regarded as a veteran manufacturing executive that would lend credibility and much needed experience to the Model 3 manufacturing process.…

Google Execs Suddenly Go Into Hiding After Project Veritas Exposes Trump Destruction Plans

A group of Google executives have suddenly deleted their social media presence after a new expose revealed their plans to use their Internet search engine to destroy President Donald Trump’s 2020 election campaign. The sudden disappearance of the Google executive’s social media accounts came on the heels of the latest undercover exposé by Project Veritas that reveals that Google is programming its machine learning algorithms (or AI) to prevent the “next Trump situation.” The Project Veritas video reveals that instead of simply doing its job as the world’s leading Internet search and archiving tool, Google is using its power over…

Media companies scramble after judge rules they are liable for Facebook comments

Major media companies and Facebook are scrambling to come to grips with a landmark ruling by an Australian judge that found publishers are legally responsible for pre-moderating comments on the social media site. On Monday in the New South Wales supreme court judge Stephen Rothman found that commercial entities, including media companies, could be regarded as the publishers of comments made on Facebook, and as such had a responsibility to ensure defamatory remarks were not posted in the first place. The judgment has potentially profound impacts on the way news organisations in Australia interact with the social media giant, and…

Facebook to give French courts data on hate speech suspects, says minister

Facebook has agreed to give French courts the identification data of users suspected of spreading hate speech on the platform, according to a French minister, in what is being described as a world first. France’s minister for digital affairs and former top advisor to President Emmanuel Macron, Cedric O, confirmed the agreement on Tuesday, but suggested the courtesy would not be extended to other nations.  “This is huge news, it means that the judicial process will be able to run normally,” O told Reuters. “It’s really very important, they’re only doing it for France.” The deal between the world’s largest…

O’Keefe Says More Big Tech Insiders Are About to Blow the Whistle

Project Veritas head James O’Keefe says more insiders are about to blow the whistle on Big Tech following yesterday’s revelation that Google is actively manipulating its algorithms to prevent Trump winning re-election. Jen Gennai, head of responsible innovation at Google, was filmed by Project Veritas admitting that Google is using AI and algorithmic manipulation to meddle in the next presidential election. “We’re also training our algorithms if 2016 happened again….would the outcome having been different?” asked Gennai, adding, “We all got screwed over in 2016, again it wasn’t just us, it was, the people got screwed over, the news media…

How A Small ISP in Pennsylvania Tanked a Big Chunk of the Web on Monday

Outages may be a fact of life on the internet, but the past few days have been especially rough for some of us. Last Tuesday, Google Calendar went down for hours. Later in the week, Netflix, Hulu, and Xbox Live had problems. (Hulu on the night of The Handmaid’s Tale, no less!) And on Monday morning, users in the Northeast United States were hit by a widespread web outage that affected Verizon users and thousands of websites serviced by Cloudflare, a little-known backbone of the internet that provides security and performance services to 16 million websites. Even Downdetecter, a website…

Turning the tables on tech support scammers

In this video, Jim Browning (previously at BB) calls back a tech support scammer, knowing what not to do and what to say to lure them into making revealing mistakes. Browning also appears to be a gifted hacker, presumably knowing of security flaws in the remote desktop software that scammers tend to use, giving him free rein on their machines. He’s quite willing to expose the details, call them in person and mess up their operations — I laughed like a drain when he got into the scammer’s PayPal and started issuing refunds to victims. I got an ‘invoice’ email…

Facebook and Google could be forced to tell you how much your data is worth under new US legislation

How much is your data worth to companies like Google and Facebook? That’s the question US senators Mark Warner and Josh Hawley want answered by introducing a bill on Monday that, if successful, would require big tech companies to disclose to individual users the value of their information. “Axios on HBO” first revealed the planned legislation, which will be titled the Designing Accounting Safeguards to Help Broaden Oversight and Regulations on Data Act, which has been given the acronym DASHBOARD. In short, it would mean users of some of the biggest social media and search platforms on the internet would…

US Mulls Requiring All Domestic 5G Gear Be Made Outside China – Reports

It appears that the United States, which has banned Chinese telecom company Huawei from providing 5G equipment to the country over “cybersecurity concerns”, is eagerly looking for a not-made-in-China alternative. The Trump administration may require that next-generation 5G telecommunications gear used in the United States be designed and made outside China, The Wall Street Journal reported, citing people familiar with the matter. As the US has already banned the use of Chinese telecom equipment by American carriers, US officials have allegedly engaged in talks with unspecified telecom firms to see if they can produce US-oriented gear elsewhere – and that’s…

Raspberry Pi 4 is a complete desktop computer for just $35

The Raspberry Pi was originally designed to provide an ultra-cheap way to encourage kids to code, but the uncased credit card sized computer has found an appreciative audience well outside of the education system, going on to sell over a million Pis in its first year alone. Each new iteration of the Pi has added something new, including a 64-bit processor, dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi, and Power over Ethernet (PoE) via a HAT. Today, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announces the Raspberry Pi 4, and it’s a game changer, offering three times the processing power and four times the multimedia performance of…

Hackers Steal 500 MB of NASA Data Using Cheap Raspberry Pi Computer

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration confirmed that its Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) was hacked last year, with the attacker able to steal 500 MB of data related to the space agency’s missions using a cheap Raspberry Pi computer. The Raspberry Pi, priced at about $36 for the basic board, is one of the most versatile and understated computing platforms available in the market. The credit card-sized computer is perfect for projects such as a retro gaming station or a smart home gadgets base station, but a hacker has apparently found a twisted use for it. NASA, in an audit…

NASA hack blamed on unauthorized Raspberry Pi

Scathing report details ten years of security issues and malpractice An unsecure and unauthorised Raspberry Pi device has been blamed for a 2018 security breach in NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a department plagued with cyber security vulnerabilities, according to a new report from NASA’s Office of Inspector General. The security breach in question saw hackers target a NASA employee’s Raspberry Pi device, which wasn’t authorised to connect to the JPL’s network, and make off with 500MB of data from one of its major mission systems. This was just one of the more recent incidents from the past ten years of “notable…

DEAD: Facebook usage falling after privacy scandals…

Facebook usage has plummeted over the last year, according to data seen by the Guardian, though the company says usage by other measures continues to grow. Since April 2018, the first full month after news of the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke in the Observer, actions on Facebook such as likes, shares and posts have dropped by almost 20%, according to the business analytics firm Mixpanel. Taking that month as a baseline, total actions fell by more that 10% within a month, recovered a bit over the summer and then fell again over the autumn and winter of 2018, except for…

Facebook running a 21st century version of sweatshops as contractors keel over dead while other workers fear for their lives

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, many small tenement apartments inhabited by European immigrants often doubled as workplaces and living spaces. There, men and women toiled away as contractors for larger corporations, churning out clothing, parts, and other products. Wages were low and hours were long, but because they were immigrants and were trying to make their way in their new country, they accepted the work eagerly. These work-and-living spaces were often miserable, and they earned the nickname “sweatshops.” While “some immigrants began working in small shops, eventually owning large clothing firms,” the National Museum of American History at…

Apple Considers Pulling 30% of iPhone Production From China Amid Trade War – Reports

In May, China vowed to respond to US President Donald Trump’s plan to hike tariffs on products imported from China, threatening to slap a 25% tariff on US goods in a move that could hike the cost of iPhones by 14%, according to forecasts. Apple Inc has been sizing up the costs of moving between 15% and 30% of all iPhone production out of China as it prepares for a restructuring of its supply chain, according to a Nikkei Asian Review report released on Wednesday. The report says the company has tasked major suppliers with making their assessments of the…

DHS to Move Biometric Data on Hundreds of Millions of People to Amazon Cloud

The Homeland Security Department is looking to upgrade the software it uses to analyze biometric data on hundreds of millions of people around the globe, and it plans to store that information in Amazon’s cloud. The agency’s Office of Biometric Identification Management will replace its legacy biometric analysis platform, called the Automated Biometric Identification System, or IDENT, with a new, more robust system hosted by Amazon Web Services, according to a request for information released Monday. IDENT essentially serves as an enterprisewide clearinghouse for troves of biometric and biographic data collected by the Transportation Security Administration, Customs and Border Protection,…

Surveillance cameras will soon be unrecognizable

It is often argued that the UK is the most surveilled country on the planet. This may or may not have been the case in the past but there are certainly now millions of surveillance cameras in public spaces—not to mention private buildings and homes. Behind those lenses they are changing in ways that people are often barely aware of, with privacy implications that should be widely discussed as a matter of urgency. Automatic face recognition is currently the hot ticket in this industry, having been introduced in a number of cities around the world, in the US, China, Germany…

Facebook unveils ‘its most invasive and dangerous form of surveillance yet’ with launch of Libra cryptocurrency

FACEBOOK is launching cryptocurrency next year that will allow people to move money from their smartphone into a digital “wallet”. The currency is known as Libra, which the social network says it has “no special role” in governing and will manage equally with a group of big companies. Experts have branded the move a dangerous power grab that marks Facebook’s “most invasive” form of surveillance yet. So far, Facebook has enlisted 28 firms, including Spotify and Uber, who each had to invest a minimum of £8million to be a founding member of the Libra Association, an independent not-for-profit membership organisation.…

All the Cyber Attack Stories from the Past Few Days Can’t Be Linked…Can They?

A very important skill for anyone who hopes to be in the know is the ability to put together seemingly unrelated stories for consideration. Over the past few days, stories about grid incursions, Russians, cyber attacks, and technological failures seemed to be at the top of the headlines. A massive cyber attack could happen far more easily than most people realize. The good folks over in Prep Club have been posting a lot of interesting links this weekend. Let’s take a peek at each one. All these stories can’t be linked…can they? The US Is Hacking Russia’s Grid On Saturday,…

Glitch of Death: Airbus is ready for pilotless jets – are you?

The chief salesman for Airbus says his company already has the technology to fly passenger planes without pilots at all — and is working on winning over regulators and travelers to the idea. Christian Scherer also said in an interview with The Associated Press on Monday that Airbus hopes to be selling hybrid or electric passenger jets by around 2035. While the company is still far from ready to churn out battery-operated jumbo jets, Scherer said Airbus already has “the technology for autonomous flying” and for planes flown by just one pilot. “This is not a matter of technology —…

Cyberattacks Make Smart Grids Look Pretty Dumb

Imagine if your thermostat led to a region-wide power blackout.  It’s a scenario that’s looking increasingly plausible. Argentina isn’t ruling out a cyberattack as the possible cause for the mass outage that affected millions of people in five South American countries over the weekend. Even if that incident turns out to have a more innocent explanation, the U.S. government is stepping up digital incursions into Russia’s power grid, the New York Times reported Saturday, citing unnamed officials.  The growing threat from hacking is somewhat inevitable given the way our power systems are changing. Electricity networks are traditionally highly centralized, with limited…

Shockingly, Cable TV and Broadband Customer Satisfaction Is Still The Worst In America

Every few years or so, giant cable and broadband companies like Comcast will proclaim that they’ve finally seen the light, and will be spending time shoring up their terrible customer service. Like a few years ago, when Comcast proclaimed it had hired a “Customer Experience VP” who would finally make addressing the company’s historically terrible customer service a top priority. CEO Brian Roberts also can be found at least once a year claiming that the company is going to finally address the problem by hiring better people, improving support systems, and generally revisiting the company’s policies. But year after year,…

Samsung says its TV sets should be “regularly checked for viruses”

The easiest way to secure shoddy internet-of-things gadgets like TV sets and cameras? Make it the consumer’s problem. Samsung has advised owners of its latest TVs to run regular virus scans. A how-to video on the Samsung Support USA Twitter account demonstrates the more than a dozen remote-control button presses required to access the sub-menu needed to activate the check. It suggested users should carry out the process “every few weeks” to “prevent malicious software attacks”. Think it’s a ridiculous idea that you should have to run antimalware scans on your television? Want to feel the bottom fall out? Sure…