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Porn trolling mastermind Paul Hansmeier gets 14 years in prison

A federal judge in Minneapolis has sentenced Paul Hansmeier to 14 years in prison for an elaborate fraud scheme that involved uploading pornographic videos to file-sharing networks and then threatening to sue people who downloaded them. “It is almost incalculable how much your abuse of trust has harmed the administration of justice,” said Judge Joan Ericksen at a Friday sentencing hearing. We’ve been covering the antics of Hansmeier and his business partner John Steele for many years. Way back in 2012, we started reporting on a law firm called Prenda Law that was filing lawsuits against people for sharing pornographic films…

12 white male officers sue San Francisco police for race, sex bias

Twelve white male San Francisco police officers are suing the city, arguing they were passed over for promotions because of their race and gender. The San Francisco Chronicle reports Wednesday that the lawsuit, which was filed Tuesday in federal court, is the latest round in a conflict that dates back decades. A 13th plaintiff who is now retired says she also was denied promotion, because she is a white lesbian. The lawsuit challenges a test-scoring method that the city adopted in 1979 in response to a lawsuit from a group representing black and female officers, who alleged discrimination in hiring…

New trouble for Alex Jones in court fight with Sandy Hook families

Alex Jones’ latest court trouble involves more than routine pre-trial wrangling with the Sandy Hook families who are suing him for defamation. The real fight is over the families’ claim that the conspiracies Jones promoted as the frontman of Infowars were calculated to drive business to his internet supplements business. Recommended Video The heart of the court case came out in dueling motions filed over the last two weeks by the families, who accuse Jones of deliberately withholding information about his business strategy to hide his motives, and by Jones, who accuses the families of having no proof and of…

Supreme Court Rejects Case to Remove ‘In God We Trust’ From Currency

The Supreme Court rejected hearing a case to remove the phrase “In God We Trust” from US currency on Monday. The case, brought on by an atheist activist, was also rejected at district and circuit court levels. Michael Newdow, the activist seeking to redesign the money to remove the US motto, claims that the phrase violates the separation of church and state. He has previously fought against schools having students recite the pledge of allegiance, as he opposes the phrase “under God.” “Petitioners are Atheists. As such, they fervidly disagree with the religious idea that people should trust in God.…

State May Vaccinate Children in Its Custody, Even Over Parents’ Objection

From N.J. Div. of Child Protection & Permanency v. J.B. (N.J. Super. Ct. App. Div.): The age appropriate immunizations required by N.J.A.C. 3A:51-7.1(a)(2) are a reasonable means of ensuring the health and safety of the children in the care and custody of the Division, especially during a measles outbreak. Parental rights must yield to the safety and well-being of Son and Daughter under these circumstances. See, e.g., Sadlock, 137 N.J.L. at 88 (“[T]he police power of a state must be held to embrace, at least, such reasonable regulations established directly by legislative enactment as will protect the public health and the public safety.” (quoting Jacobson v. Massachusetts, 197 U.S. 11, 25 (1905))).…

Wells Fargo will pay customers $386 million over unwanted auto insurance

Wells Fargo & Co will pay customers at least $386 million to settle class-action claims that the bank signed them up for auto insurance they did not want or need when they took out car loans. The proposed settlement was disclosed in filings on Thursday with the U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, California, and requires a judge’s approval. National General Insurance Co, an underwriter, will pay an additional $7.5 million, making the total customer payout at least $393.5 million, according to the filings. Wells Fargo denied wrongdoing but said it settled to avoid the risks, cost and distraction of…

Federal Judge Rules People Can Secretly Record Police in Public

A federal judge ordered the Boston Police Department and the Suffolk County District Attorney to notify cops and government officials that while they are on-duty and in public spaces they can be legally secretly recorded. René Pérez and Eric Martin, two Boston civil rights activists, were among the plaintiffs in the case against the Boston District Attorney and the Police commissioner. Judge Patti B. Saris’ judgment on Wednesday enforces an earlier decision from last year, that it was unconstitutional for police to arrest people for secretly recording government officials. In the December court decision, it was revealed that since 2011,…

Carnival slapped with a $20 million fine after it was caught dumping trash into the ocean, again

Carnival Corp will pay a $20 million settlement after Princess Cruises, a Carnival subsidiary, admitted to violating the terms of a 2017 settlement for improper waste disposal. According to a court filing submitted on Monday, Carnival released food waste and plastic into the ocean, failed to accurately record waste disposals, created false training records, and secretly examined ships to fix environmental-compliance issues before third-party inspections without reporting its findings to the inspectors. Monday’s settlement requires Carnival to pay $20 million within seven days, receive additional ship inspections, devote more resources to ensure compliance with the 2017 settlement, reduce the number…

A 16-Year-Old Girl Is Facing Child Pornography Charges for Making a Sex Video of Herself

Maryland’s highest court will soon decide whether a 16-year-old girl, “S.K.,” can face child pornography charges for taking a video of herself performing a sex act and sending it to a few of her close friends. S.K. shared the video, in which she performs consensual oral sex on an unidentified male, with two close friends and fellow students, who later reported her to the school resource officer. S.K. was the only person charged in connection with the alleged crime. The Special Court of Appeals upheld S.K.’s conviction, ruling that the consensual nature of the sex act in question was irrelevant,…

‘Pharma bro’ Martin Shkreli sues Retrophin directors, ex-general counsel for more than $30 million from prison in Pennsylvania

Notorious “pharma bro” Martin Shkreli on Friday sued two directors and the ex-general counsel of his former biopharmaceutical company Retrophin, accusing them of using fraud to oust him as head of the firm in 2014. Shkreli’s lawsuit, which was filed in federal court in Manhattan, is seeking damages of more than $30 million. It was lodged within days of the 36-year-old Shkreli being transferred to a new prison in Pennsylvania, where he will continue serving a seven-year sentence for securities fraud related to his two defunct hedge funds and to Retrophin, which he founded after the funds financially collapsed. The named…

Texas Court: Tossing A Cigarette From Car Is Illegal

The Texas Court of Appeals does not want smokers tossing lit cigarettes out car windows. In a ruling Thursday, a three-judge panel overturned a county judge’s interpretation of the littering statute that held tossing a lit cigarette could only be a crime if it happened to start a fire. The distinction was relevant to Michael Lance Wood, who was stopped on February 4, 2018, in Salado. Officer Matthew Hicks suspected Wood might be tipsy based on his driving, and as soon as the officer saw a lit cigarette drop out the window onto the ground, he had the justification he…

Jussie Smollett update: Judge rules to unseal records in ‘Empire’ actor’s case

A judge ruled Thursday to unseal documents in the case of “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett. The records were sealed in March shortly after charges against Smollett were abruptly dropped by prosecutors. Attorneys representing the media, including ABC7, challenged the sealing of the records. The unsealed records are expected to be released at some point Thursday. The “Empire” actor faced several charges for allegedly staging a racist and homophobic attack on himself in January. The TV actor claimed he was the victim of a vicious hate crime in the Streeterville neighborhood on January 29. He said two men physically attacked him…

Judge refuses to toss suit over Pepe the Frog poster sales by Alex Jones

A federal judge will let a jury decide whether conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ Infowars website had a legal right to sell a poster featuring the image of Pepe the Frog, a cartoon character that became hijacked by far-right extremists. U.S. District Judge Michael Fitzgerald refused Thursday to throw out a copyright infringement lawsuit that Pepe’s creator, California-based artist Matt Furie, filed against Infowars over its poster sales. Lawyers for Furie and Infowars both said they were pleased by the ruling, which clears a path for a jury trial to begin July 16 in Los Angeles. Louis Tompros, one Furie’s lawyers,…

Federal court moves to unseal documents in Jeffrey Epstein scandal

A federal court of appeals in New York on Monday took the first step in unsealing documents that could reveal evidence of an international sex trafficking operation allegedly run by multimillionaire Jeffrey Epstein and his former partner, British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell. The three-judge panel for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit gave the parties until March 19 to establish good cause as to why they should remain sealed and, failing to do so, the summary judgment and supporting documents will be made public. The court reserved a ruling on the balance of the documents in the civil…

Bayer must pay $2bn to couple in Monsanto cancer trial, jury rules

A California jury on Monday awarded more than $2bn to a couple who claimed Bayer AG’s glyphosate-based Roundup weed killer caused their cancer, marking the third consecutive US jury verdict against the company in litigation over the chemical. The jury in San Francisco superior court in Oakland said the company was liable for plaintiffs Alva and Alberta Pilliod’s contracting non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a spokeswoman for the couple said. It awarded $18m in compensatory and $1bn in punitive damages to Alva Pilliod and $37m in compensatory and $1bn in punitive damages to his wife, Alberta Pilliod. The jury found Roundup had been…

Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint, and AT&T Hit With Class Action Lawsuit Over Selling Customers’ Location Data

On Thursday, lawyers filed lawsuits against four of the country’s major telecommunications companies for their role in various location data scandals uncovered by Motherboard, Senator Ron Wyden, and The New York Times. Bloomberg Law was first to report the lawsuits. The news provides the first instance of individual telco customers pushing to be awarded damages after Motherboard revealed in January that AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint had all sold access to the real-time location of their customers’ phones to a network of middlemen companies, before ending up in the hands of bounty hunters. Motherboard previously paid a source $300 to successfully…

Jussie Smollett Will Not Attend Chicago Court Hearing

The Empire star, Jussie Smollett, will not attend a court hearing on “whether a special prosecutor will be appointed to investigate prosecutors’ dismissal of charges against him, his publicist told the Associated Press Wednesday.” This comment came on the heels of Smollett’s attorney filing a motion to reject judge (retired appellate) Sheila O’Brien’s formal request to have him appear in court in Chicago this Thursday. Smollet’s attorney said the reasoning for him not returning to the city is because he has moved out since wrapping up his role on “Empire,” and returning to the city would cause “additional security measures”…

The Feds Are Dropping Child Porn Cases Instead of Revealing Info on Their Surveillance Systems

The Department of Justice has been dismissing child pornography cases in order to not reveal information about the software programs used as the basis for the charges. An array of cases suggest serious problems with the tech tools used by federal authorities. But the private entities who developed these tools won’t submit them for independent inspection or hand over hardly any information about how they work, their error rates, or other critical information. As a result, potentially innocent people are being smeared as pedophiles and prosecuted as child porn collectors, while potentially guilty people are going free so these companies…

Federal Appeals Court Outlaws Tire Chalking

Delivering a severe blow to the parking ticket industry, the Sixth Circuit US Court of Appeals on Monday said meter maids violate the US Constitution when they mark motorist tires with chalk. The three-judge appellate panel sided with a driver who brought suit against the city of Saginaw, Michigan, which sent out a pair of meter maids to mark the tires of cars in parking spaces for the purpose of issuing tickets. Last year, the town of 49,000 raised $222,094 from parking citations that range in cost from $15 to $100 each. Motorist Alison Patricia Taylor sued the city after…

Florida Court Reverses Ban On Anti-Cancer License Plate Frames

The Florida Court of Appeal on Wednesday lifted a court-imposed ban on license plate frames, including one for a popular charity. The Fort Lauderdale-based car dealership AutoNation has raised $18 million for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation by attaching a pink frame to the vehicles it sells and asking customers to add a contribution of their own. Last year, the court found a similar frame that partially blocked the phrase “MyFlorida.com” and “Sunshine State” violated a state law forbidding anything from covering the word “Florida” (view case). That ruling, however, was based on the law in effect at the time…

Appeals court rejects Chelsea Manning’s effort to leave jail

A federal appeals court on Monday rejected a bid by former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to be released from jail for refusing to testify to a grand jury investigating Wikileaks. The three-paragraph, unanimous decision from a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond rejects both Manning’s argument that she was erroneously found in civil contempt of court and her request for bail while the contempt decision is litigated. Manning has been jailed at the Alexandria Detention Center since March 8 after refusing to testify to the Wikileaks grand jury. Since her incarceration, criminal charges…

Why Philly’s Reformist Prosecutor Finally Supports Letting Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Appeal Go Forward

Mumia Abu-Jamal’s long struggle for freedom and justice gained crucial ground this week. The former Black Panther, activist, and journalist will get a new hearing to appeal his conviction for the 1981 killing of a Philadelphia police officer. On Wednesday, Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner dropped his opposition to the appeal, opening a potential — though far from assured — avenue to freedom for Abu-Jamal, an outcome that had previously seemed impossible. In January, Krasner’s office decided to fight Abu-Jamal’s appeal. He told The Intercept at the time that the move was “a narrow, technical decision in one sense, but…

Seagram’s Heiress Clare Bronfman Pleads Guilty in NXIVM Sex-Cult Case

Seagram’s heiress Clare Bronfman pleaded guilty on Friday afternoon for her role in NXIVM, a purported cult in which women were allegedly branded and groomed for sex with the group’s leader. Bronfman, 40, who was once NXIVM’s operations director and one of its largest donors, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to conceal and harbor illegal aliens for financial gain and fraudulent use of identification. ADVERTISING The group’s bookkeeper Kathy Russell, 62, also pleaded guilty Friday to one count of racketeering conspiracy before U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis in Brooklyn federal court. Russell later pleaded guilty to one count of visa fraud,…

Sears sues Lampert, claiming he looted assets and drove it into bankruptcy

Sears Holdings Corp sued longtime former chairman Eddie Lampert, his hedge fund ESL Investments and others like Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, claiming they illegally siphoned billions of dollars of assets from the retailer before it went bankrupt. The lawsuit, made public on Thursday, was filed by the restructuring team winding down Sears’ bankruptcy estate and suing on behalf of creditors, many of whom blame Lampert for the retailer’s downfall. It followed the billionaire’s $5.2 billion purchase in February of most Sears assets, including the DieHard and Kenmore brands, after a bankruptcy auction. The complaint seeks the repayment of “billions of…

New York City’s mandatory measles vaccine orders trigger lawsuit from parents

Five parents filed a lawsuit Monday against the New York City Department of Health claiming the city overstepped its authority by making vaccinations mandatory in neighborhoods experiencing the measles outbreak. The parents claimed last week’s orders violated their “children’s religious exemptions” to vaccinations and their constitutional rights to due process. They also said forcing vaccinations would put their kids at risk to harm. “The emergency orders grossly understate the risk of harm to children, adults and the general public from the MMR vaccine, while at the same time overstating the benefits,” the lawsuit claimed, calling on the New York Supreme Court to…

Daycare owner posted $100,000 bail for accused child rapist R Kelly

The woman who posted the $100,000 bail that enabled R Kelly to walk out of prison on Monday evening has been revealed in court documents obtained by DailyMail.com. Valencia Love, 47, lives just outside Chicago in Romeoville, and on the form she submitted in Cook County Court stated that she is friends with Kelly. Love owns a number of restaurants according to records obtained by DailyMail.com as well as a childcare facility, the Lord and Child Christian Day Care. She posted that bail despite the fact that Kelly is accused of raping three underage teenagers in this latest Cook County indictment,…

Now you can’t even TALK about guns…1st Amendment now cited in 2nd Amendment weapons fight

Most gun-rights cases cite the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects the rights of Americans to keep and bear arms. This one, however, revolves around the First Amendment, the freedom to speak and communicate about guns. The Second Amendment Foundation and other parties are suing New Jersey Attorney General Gurbig Grewal over the state’s attempts to limit their speech. They are asking for a preliminary order to prevent the irreparable loss of their speech rights. SAF said its lawyers are targeting a new law in the state “that prohibits any kind of publication or distribution of information relating…

Federal prosecutors broke law in Jeffrey Epstein case, judge rules

A judge ruled Thursday that federal prosecutors — among them, U.S. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta — broke federal law when they signed a plea agreement with a wealthy, politically connected sex trafficker and concealed it from more than 30 of his underage victims. U.S. District Judge Kenneth A. Marra, in a 33-page opinion, said that the evidence he reviewed showed that Jeffrey Epstein had been operating an international sex operation in which he and others recruited underage girls — not only in Florida — but from overseas, in violation of federal law. “Epstein used paid employees to find and bring…

FDA Sued for Recommending Untested, Unlicensed Flu Vaccine for Pregnant Women

In response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit, the FDA has admitted, for the first time, that government agencies, including the CDC, are recommending vaccines for pregnant women that have neither been licensed for pregnant mothers by the FDA nor tested for safety in clinical trials. The lawsuit, filed by Children’s Health Defense (CHD) attorney, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. on behalf of Informed Consent Action Network (ICAN), a vaccine safety advocacy group, sought all clinical trial data used by FDA to approve influenza vaccines for pregnant women. The FDA’s terse reply: “We have no records responsive to your requests.”…

Justice Department opens new probe into Jeffrey Epstein plea deal

The Justice Department has launched a probe into how federal government lawyers negotiated a controversial plea deal with a wealthy Florida man accused of having sex with underage girls. One of those lawyers, R. Alexander Acosta, is President Donald Trump’s labor secretary. Acosta reportedly helped Jeffrey Epstein, the billionaire pedophile who was found guilty of abusing more than 80 women, cut a secret non-prosecution agreement that shut down a federal investigation into a trans-Atlantic sex trafficking operation of underage girls when he was the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida. The alleged crimes could have put Epstein in prison for life. Instead, Acosta, as the…

U.S. sues Lockheed, others for alleged kickbacks on nuclear site cleanup

The United States has sued Lockheed Martin Corp, Lockheed Martin Services Inc, and Mission Support Alliance LLC, as well as a Lockheed executive for alleged false claims and kickbacks on a multibillion-dollar contract to clean up a nuclear site, the Justice Department said on Friday. The complaint alleges Lockheed paid more than $1 million to Mission Support Alliance executives in order to win a $232 million subcontract for providing management and technology support at the Hanford, Washington site from 2010 through the middle of 2016 at inflated rates. It also says the defendants lied about the amount of profit included…

Man sues his parents for giving birth to him ‘without his consent’, wants to be paid for his life

A 27-year-old Indian man is going viral after he announced an intent to sue his parents, claiming he didn’t give his explicit consent to bring him into the world. Raphael Samuel, donning a fake beard and sunglasses, said in a YouTube video posted on Tuesday that he is suing his parents because he was conceived without his consent and therefore his parents should pay for his life. “If we are born without our consent, we should be maintained for our life. We should be paid by our parents to live.” “I want everyone in India and the world to realize one…

Sheriff’s use of courtroom camera to view juror’s notebook, lawyer’s notes sparks dismissal of criminal case

Charges were thrown out in a San Juan assault case after it was revealed the county sheriff had been using the court security camera to focus on defense notes and a juror’s notebook. Some defense attorneys in San Juan County worry that Sheriff Ron Krebs has a finger on the scales of justice after learning he used a courtroom security camera to surreptitiously zoom in on defense documents and a juror’s notebook during a criminal trial last week. The incident has drawn outrage from criminal and civil-rights attorneys and frustration from the county prosecutor, and prompted a rare weekend hearing during…

Ohio Police Shoot Military Vet Multiple Times, Then Let Him Bleed to Death

The Rutherford Institute is weighing in on a case in which police shot a military veteran multiple times, then let him bleed to death rather than rendering emergency aid. Arguing that police have a constitutional obligation to provide life-saving aid to those injured during the course of an arrest, attorneys for The Rutherford Institute have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate a lawsuit against two Ohio police officers who, despite being trained in first aid, failed to intervene to save the life of a military veteran as he lay bleeding to death from at least four gunshot wounds. The…

Court dismisses Defense Distributed’s lawsuit over New Jersey “ghost gun” law

Sometimes lawsuits can be like real estate—all about location, location, location. And this week at a federal court in Texas, US District Judge Robert Pitman made a ruling (PDF) that ended Defense Distributed v. Grewal (PDF), the lawsuit brought last summer by the 3D printed firearms company (and colleagues like the Second Amendment Foundation) against New Jersey State Attorney General Gurbir Grewal. From Defense Distributed’s perspective, the core question involved whether a NJ statute aimed at regulating “ghost guns” violated the Constitution. The company believed such a law infringed on its right to free speech (among other legal claims). Judge…

Candy makers Ghirardelli and Russell Stover slapped with $750,000 fine for misleading customers by selling chocolate products in oversized containers that were “predominantly empty”

Have you ever opened a large box of chocolates Opens a New Window. and were disappointed by the small pieces of sweets inside? Well, you are not alone. Candy makers Ghirardelli and Russell Stover were slapped with a $750,000 fine last week after they were sued in California for alleging misleading customers by selling chocolate products in oversized containers that were “predominantly empty.” The civil complaint, which was filed by California prosecutors, alleged that the two companies, who fall under common ownership of Swiss chocolate maker Lindt & Sprungli, packaged certain chocolate products in oversized packaging to deceive consumers into…

If Corporations Are People, Some of Them Should Go to Jail

Up in the Commonwealth—God save it!—we have this attorney general named Maura Healey. She isn’t the biggest person, but she’s a former Boston College point guard who can still play. And she is not someone whose attention you want to draw, especially if you happen to be someone working scams that end up killing people and starting nationwide epidemics. The Sackler family, which got rich developing and marketing Oxycontin, has drawn Healey’s attention. From WBUR: “I promise you that we will hold opioid makers accountable for the role they played in creating this crisis…we will do whatever it takes to…

Athlete Confined To Wheelchair After Her Third Gardasil Vaccine Takes Merck To Court

On Wednesday January 9th, I attended Science Day Presentations in the Jennifer Robi vs. Merck and Kaiser Permanente case in Los Angeles Superior Court. I want to report to our community on the outcome of this important event and provide some personal commentary. It is difficult to describe the feelings of elation and frustration that I experienced during the full day of furious arguments that began at 9:30 am before Judge Maren Nelson. Due to the restrictions of the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act, my son and thousands of children like him, have never been able to have their injuries…

US Supreme Court to decide whether a warrant is needed to take blood from an unconscious motorist suspected of drunk driving

Do police need a warrant to take blood from an unconscious motorist? The US Supreme Court earlier this month decided to answer that question by accepting the case of Gerald P. Mitchell. The justices will decide whether Wisconsin’s implied consent law can affirmatively state that individuals, like Mitchell, who are not awake automatically agree to have their blood taken. Wisconsin’s highest court saw no problem with the law used to take Mitchell’s blood on May 30, 2013. After receiving a phone report, Sheboygan police Officer Alex Jaeger found Mitchell walking near the beach, drunk. He told the officer that he…

Study Finds Traffic Ticket Debt Hits Poor Hardest

The impact of traffic tickets on motorists who are struggling economically can be devastating, according to a recent study by an economics researcher at Princeton University. Steven Mello, who is finalizing his doctorate in economics, conducted an analysis of the impact of traffic tickets on Florida drivers using individual credit report data with payrolls to calculate the impact of a citation. From 2011 to 2015, about 4.5 million Florida drivers received a traffic citation, amounting to nearly a third of the driving age population. Demographic data show more tickets are issued in low-income areas, and in these areas each ticket…

Federal Appeals Court: Not Need For Passenger ID In Traffic Stop-Police cannot demand ID from passengers during a traffic stop without reasonable suspicion of a crime

Passengers do not need to hand over their identification during traffic stops, the Ninth Circuit US Court of Appeals on Friday. Non-drivers only need to show their papers if police have a specific reason to believe they are involved in a crime. The appellate court reversed its previous rulings on the matter after considering the circumstances of a traffic stop that took place in Arizona on February 9, 2016. That morning, tribal police officer Clinton Baker stopped a car traveling near the Pascua Yaqui Indian reservation for allegedly exceeding the speed limit by 11 MPH. The driver handed over his…

Hacker who took down entire nation’s internet is jailed

A British hacker whose cyberattacks took the nation of Liberia offline has been jailed for almost three years. Daniel Kaye launched a series of attacks on Liberian cell phone operator Lonestar in October 2015, which became so powerful they knocked out the west African country’s internet the following year. Kaye, 30, had been hired to carry out the attacks by a senior employee at rival operator Cellcom, Britain’s National Crime Agency said in a statement, although there is no suggestion that Cellcom was aware of the activity. He pleaded guilty to creating and using a botnet, a series of computers…

Families of Sandy Hook shooting victims win legal victory in lawsuit against InfoWars, Alex Jones

Six families of victims killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School won a legal victory Friday in their fight against controversial radio and internet personality Alex Jones. A judge in Connecticut has granted the families’ discovery requests, allowing them access to, among other things, InfoWars’ internal marketing and financial documents. (MORE: Remembering the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victims) The judge has scheduled a hearing next week to decide whether to allow the plaintiffs’ attorneys to depose Jones. The families sued Jones and InfoWars for defamation and accused him of perpetuating a “monstrous, unspeakable lie: that the Sandy Hook shooting was…

Federal Court Upholds Traffic Stop Over Fast Blinker

Driving with a turn signal that blinks “too fast” is a potentially criminal act under a ruling handed down Tuesday by the Eleventh Circuit US Court of Appeals. The three-judge appellate panel set the precedent after considering a traffic stop that took place on December 12, 2013, in Greene County, Georgia. On that day, Deputy Sheriff Robert McCannon stopped the Erickson Meko Campbell’s Nissan Maxima on Interstate 20 in Georgia after noticing his turn signal blinked rapidly when making a lane change. The deputy also said he saw the gray sedan cross the fog line once, then after he turned…

Former pharma CEO pleads guilty to bribing doctors to prescribe addictive opioids

The former chief executive of Insys Therapeutics Inc (INSY.O) pleaded guilty on Wednesday to participating in a nationwide scheme to bribe doctors to prescribe an addictive opioid medication and has agreed to become a government witness. Michael Babich, who resigned as the Arizona-based drugmaker’s CEO in 2015, pleaded guilty in federal court in Boston to conspiracy and mail fraud charges after entering into a cooperation deal with prosecutors. His plea comes less than three weeks before five former Insys executives and managers including John Kapoor, its onetime billionaire founder and former chairman, face trial after being charged with participating in…