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Seagram’s Heiress Clare Bronfman Pleads Guilty in NXIVM Sex-Cult Case

Seagram’s heiress Clare Bronfman pleaded guilty on Friday afternoon for her role in NXIVM, a purported cult in which women were allegedly branded and groomed for sex with the group’s leader. Bronfman, 40, who was once NXIVM’s operations director and one of its largest donors, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to conceal and harbor illegal aliens for financial gain and fraudulent use of identification. ADVERTISING The group’s bookkeeper Kathy Russell, 62, also pleaded guilty Friday to one count of racketeering conspiracy before U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis in Brooklyn federal court. Russell later pleaded guilty to one count of visa fraud,…

Sears sues Lampert, claiming he looted assets and drove it into bankruptcy

Sears Holdings Corp sued longtime former chairman Eddie Lampert, his hedge fund ESL Investments and others like Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, claiming they illegally siphoned billions of dollars of assets from the retailer before it went bankrupt. The lawsuit, made public on Thursday, was filed by the restructuring team winding down Sears’ bankruptcy estate and suing on behalf of creditors, many of whom blame Lampert for the retailer’s downfall. It followed the billionaire’s $5.2 billion purchase in February of most Sears assets, including the DieHard and Kenmore brands, after a bankruptcy auction. The complaint seeks the repayment of “billions of…

New York City’s mandatory measles vaccine orders trigger lawsuit from parents

Five parents filed a lawsuit Monday against the New York City Department of Health claiming the city overstepped its authority by making vaccinations mandatory in neighborhoods experiencing the measles outbreak. The parents claimed last week’s orders violated their “children’s religious exemptions” to vaccinations and their constitutional rights to due process. They also said forcing vaccinations would put their kids at risk to harm. “The emergency orders grossly understate the risk of harm to children, adults and the general public from the MMR vaccine, while at the same time overstating the benefits,” the lawsuit claimed, calling on the New York Supreme Court to…

Daycare owner posted $100,000 bail for accused child rapist R Kelly

The woman who posted the $100,000 bail that enabled R Kelly to walk out of prison on Monday evening has been revealed in court documents obtained by DailyMail.com. Valencia Love, 47, lives just outside Chicago in Romeoville, and on the form she submitted in Cook County Court stated that she is friends with Kelly. Love owns a number of restaurants according to records obtained by DailyMail.com as well as a childcare facility, the Lord and Child Christian Day Care. She posted that bail despite the fact that Kelly is accused of raping three underage teenagers in this latest Cook County indictment,…

Now you can’t even TALK about guns…1st Amendment now cited in 2nd Amendment weapons fight

Most gun-rights cases cite the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects the rights of Americans to keep and bear arms. This one, however, revolves around the First Amendment, the freedom to speak and communicate about guns. The Second Amendment Foundation and other parties are suing New Jersey Attorney General Gurbig Grewal over the state’s attempts to limit their speech. They are asking for a preliminary order to prevent the irreparable loss of their speech rights. SAF said its lawyers are targeting a new law in the state “that prohibits any kind of publication or distribution of information relating…

Federal prosecutors broke law in Jeffrey Epstein case, judge rules

A judge ruled Thursday that federal prosecutors — among them, U.S. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta — broke federal law when they signed a plea agreement with a wealthy, politically connected sex trafficker and concealed it from more than 30 of his underage victims. U.S. District Judge Kenneth A. Marra, in a 33-page opinion, said that the evidence he reviewed showed that Jeffrey Epstein had been operating an international sex operation in which he and others recruited underage girls — not only in Florida — but from overseas, in violation of federal law. “Epstein used paid employees to find and bring…

FDA Sued for Recommending Untested, Unlicensed Flu Vaccine for Pregnant Women

In response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit, the FDA has admitted, for the first time, that government agencies, including the CDC, are recommending vaccines for pregnant women that have neither been licensed for pregnant mothers by the FDA nor tested for safety in clinical trials. The lawsuit, filed by Children’s Health Defense (CHD) attorney, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. on behalf of Informed Consent Action Network (ICAN), a vaccine safety advocacy group, sought all clinical trial data used by FDA to approve influenza vaccines for pregnant women. The FDA’s terse reply: “We have no records responsive to your requests.”…

Justice Department opens new probe into Jeffrey Epstein plea deal

The Justice Department has launched a probe into how federal government lawyers negotiated a controversial plea deal with a wealthy Florida man accused of having sex with underage girls. One of those lawyers, R. Alexander Acosta, is President Donald Trump’s labor secretary. Acosta reportedly helped Jeffrey Epstein, the billionaire pedophile who was found guilty of abusing more than 80 women, cut a secret non-prosecution agreement that shut down a federal investigation into a trans-Atlantic sex trafficking operation of underage girls when he was the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida. The alleged crimes could have put Epstein in prison for life. Instead, Acosta, as the…

U.S. sues Lockheed, others for alleged kickbacks on nuclear site cleanup

The United States has sued Lockheed Martin Corp, Lockheed Martin Services Inc, and Mission Support Alliance LLC, as well as a Lockheed executive for alleged false claims and kickbacks on a multibillion-dollar contract to clean up a nuclear site, the Justice Department said on Friday. The complaint alleges Lockheed paid more than $1 million to Mission Support Alliance executives in order to win a $232 million subcontract for providing management and technology support at the Hanford, Washington site from 2010 through the middle of 2016 at inflated rates. It also says the defendants lied about the amount of profit included…

Man sues his parents for giving birth to him ‘without his consent’, wants to be paid for his life

A 27-year-old Indian man is going viral after he announced an intent to sue his parents, claiming he didn’t give his explicit consent to bring him into the world. Raphael Samuel, donning a fake beard and sunglasses, said in a YouTube video posted on Tuesday that he is suing his parents because he was conceived without his consent and therefore his parents should pay for his life. “If we are born without our consent, we should be maintained for our life. We should be paid by our parents to live.” “I want everyone in India and the world to realize one…

Sheriff’s use of courtroom camera to view juror’s notebook, lawyer’s notes sparks dismissal of criminal case

Charges were thrown out in a San Juan assault case after it was revealed the county sheriff had been using the court security camera to focus on defense notes and a juror’s notebook. Some defense attorneys in San Juan County worry that Sheriff Ron Krebs has a finger on the scales of justice after learning he used a courtroom security camera to surreptitiously zoom in on defense documents and a juror’s notebook during a criminal trial last week. The incident has drawn outrage from criminal and civil-rights attorneys and frustration from the county prosecutor, and prompted a rare weekend hearing during…

Ohio Police Shoot Military Vet Multiple Times, Then Let Him Bleed to Death

The Rutherford Institute is weighing in on a case in which police shot a military veteran multiple times, then let him bleed to death rather than rendering emergency aid. Arguing that police have a constitutional obligation to provide life-saving aid to those injured during the course of an arrest, attorneys for The Rutherford Institute have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate a lawsuit against two Ohio police officers who, despite being trained in first aid, failed to intervene to save the life of a military veteran as he lay bleeding to death from at least four gunshot wounds. The…

Court dismisses Defense Distributed’s lawsuit over New Jersey “ghost gun” law

Sometimes lawsuits can be like real estate—all about location, location, location. And this week at a federal court in Texas, US District Judge Robert Pitman made a ruling (PDF) that ended Defense Distributed v. Grewal (PDF), the lawsuit brought last summer by the 3D printed firearms company (and colleagues like the Second Amendment Foundation) against New Jersey State Attorney General Gurbir Grewal. From Defense Distributed’s perspective, the core question involved whether a NJ statute aimed at regulating “ghost guns” violated the Constitution. The company believed such a law infringed on its right to free speech (among other legal claims). Judge…

Candy makers Ghirardelli and Russell Stover slapped with $750,000 fine for misleading customers by selling chocolate products in oversized containers that were “predominantly empty”

Have you ever opened a large box of chocolates Opens a New Window. and were disappointed by the small pieces of sweets inside? Well, you are not alone. Candy makers Ghirardelli and Russell Stover were slapped with a $750,000 fine last week after they were sued in California for alleging misleading customers by selling chocolate products in oversized containers that were “predominantly empty.” The civil complaint, which was filed by California prosecutors, alleged that the two companies, who fall under common ownership of Swiss chocolate maker Lindt & Sprungli, packaged certain chocolate products in oversized packaging to deceive consumers into…

If Corporations Are People, Some of Them Should Go to Jail

Up in the Commonwealth—God save it!—we have this attorney general named Maura Healey. She isn’t the biggest person, but she’s a former Boston College point guard who can still play. And she is not someone whose attention you want to draw, especially if you happen to be someone working scams that end up killing people and starting nationwide epidemics. The Sackler family, which got rich developing and marketing Oxycontin, has drawn Healey’s attention. From WBUR: “I promise you that we will hold opioid makers accountable for the role they played in creating this crisis…we will do whatever it takes to…

Athlete Confined To Wheelchair After Her Third Gardasil Vaccine Takes Merck To Court

On Wednesday January 9th, I attended Science Day Presentations in the Jennifer Robi vs. Merck and Kaiser Permanente case in Los Angeles Superior Court. I want to report to our community on the outcome of this important event and provide some personal commentary. It is difficult to describe the feelings of elation and frustration that I experienced during the full day of furious arguments that began at 9:30 am before Judge Maren Nelson. Due to the restrictions of the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act, my son and thousands of children like him, have never been able to have their injuries…

US Supreme Court to decide whether a warrant is needed to take blood from an unconscious motorist suspected of drunk driving

Do police need a warrant to take blood from an unconscious motorist? The US Supreme Court earlier this month decided to answer that question by accepting the case of Gerald P. Mitchell. The justices will decide whether Wisconsin’s implied consent law can affirmatively state that individuals, like Mitchell, who are not awake automatically agree to have their blood taken. Wisconsin’s highest court saw no problem with the law used to take Mitchell’s blood on May 30, 2013. After receiving a phone report, Sheboygan police Officer Alex Jaeger found Mitchell walking near the beach, drunk. He told the officer that he…

Study Finds Traffic Ticket Debt Hits Poor Hardest

The impact of traffic tickets on motorists who are struggling economically can be devastating, according to a recent study by an economics researcher at Princeton University. Steven Mello, who is finalizing his doctorate in economics, conducted an analysis of the impact of traffic tickets on Florida drivers using individual credit report data with payrolls to calculate the impact of a citation. From 2011 to 2015, about 4.5 million Florida drivers received a traffic citation, amounting to nearly a third of the driving age population. Demographic data show more tickets are issued in low-income areas, and in these areas each ticket…

Federal Appeals Court: Not Need For Passenger ID In Traffic Stop-Police cannot demand ID from passengers during a traffic stop without reasonable suspicion of a crime

Passengers do not need to hand over their identification during traffic stops, the Ninth Circuit US Court of Appeals on Friday. Non-drivers only need to show their papers if police have a specific reason to believe they are involved in a crime. The appellate court reversed its previous rulings on the matter after considering the circumstances of a traffic stop that took place in Arizona on February 9, 2016. That morning, tribal police officer Clinton Baker stopped a car traveling near the Pascua Yaqui Indian reservation for allegedly exceeding the speed limit by 11 MPH. The driver handed over his…

Hacker who took down entire nation’s internet is jailed

A British hacker whose cyberattacks took the nation of Liberia offline has been jailed for almost three years. Daniel Kaye launched a series of attacks on Liberian cell phone operator Lonestar in October 2015, which became so powerful they knocked out the west African country’s internet the following year. Kaye, 30, had been hired to carry out the attacks by a senior employee at rival operator Cellcom, Britain’s National Crime Agency said in a statement, although there is no suggestion that Cellcom was aware of the activity. He pleaded guilty to creating and using a botnet, a series of computers…

Families of Sandy Hook shooting victims win legal victory in lawsuit against InfoWars, Alex Jones

Six families of victims killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School won a legal victory Friday in their fight against controversial radio and internet personality Alex Jones. A judge in Connecticut has granted the families’ discovery requests, allowing them access to, among other things, InfoWars’ internal marketing and financial documents. (MORE: Remembering the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victims) The judge has scheduled a hearing next week to decide whether to allow the plaintiffs’ attorneys to depose Jones. The families sued Jones and InfoWars for defamation and accused him of perpetuating a “monstrous, unspeakable lie: that the Sandy Hook shooting was…

Federal Court Upholds Traffic Stop Over Fast Blinker

Driving with a turn signal that blinks “too fast” is a potentially criminal act under a ruling handed down Tuesday by the Eleventh Circuit US Court of Appeals. The three-judge appellate panel set the precedent after considering a traffic stop that took place on December 12, 2013, in Greene County, Georgia. On that day, Deputy Sheriff Robert McCannon stopped the Erickson Meko Campbell’s Nissan Maxima on Interstate 20 in Georgia after noticing his turn signal blinked rapidly when making a lane change. The deputy also said he saw the gray sedan cross the fog line once, then after he turned…

Former pharma CEO pleads guilty to bribing doctors to prescribe addictive opioids

The former chief executive of Insys Therapeutics Inc (INSY.O) pleaded guilty on Wednesday to participating in a nationwide scheme to bribe doctors to prescribe an addictive opioid medication and has agreed to become a government witness. Michael Babich, who resigned as the Arizona-based drugmaker’s CEO in 2015, pleaded guilty in federal court in Boston to conspiracy and mail fraud charges after entering into a cooperation deal with prosecutors. His plea comes less than three weeks before five former Insys executives and managers including John Kapoor, its onetime billionaire founder and former chairman, face trial after being charged with participating in…

Federal Court Strikes Down Iowa’s ‘Ag Gag’ Law as Unconstitutional

A 2012 law that banned undercover recording at agricultural production facilities in Iowa has been struck down. The law, signed by then Governor Terry Branstad, made it illegal for anyone to go undercover as a worker at an agriculture production facility for the purposes of recording the treatment of animals. Activists decried the law, saying it kept them from informing the public about potential inhumane or illegal activities. A collection of animal activist groups including the ACLU, Animal Legal Defense Fund, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, Center for Food Safety, Public Justice and Bailing Out Benji joined together…

Johns Hopkins, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Rockefeller Foundation must face lawsuit over roles in U.S. government experiment

A federal judge in Maryland said The Johns Hopkins University, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co (BMY.N) and the Rockefeller Foundation must face a $1 billion lawsuit over their roles in a 1940s U.S. government experiment that infected hundreds of Guatemalans with syphilis. In a decision on Thursday, U.S. District Judge Theodore Chuang rejected the defendants’ argument that a recent Supreme Court decision shielding foreign corporations from lawsuits in U.S. courts over human rights abuses abroad also applied to domestic corporations absent Congressional authorization. Chuang’s decision is a victory for 444 victims and relatives of victims suing over the experiment, which was aimed…

Can New Jersey Ban the Distribution of Computer Files That Can Help Make Guns?

A hearing is scheduled on January 15 in a U.S. District Court in Austin, Texas, in a federal lawsuit over the state of New Jersey’s law that bars distributing digital information that could assist in making a gun to anyone in that state who is not a registered or licensed gun manufacturer. Defense Distributed, a company founded by Cody Wilson, inventor of the first plastic 3D-printed pistol, and dedicated to distributing hardware and software aiding in home gunsmithing, is involved in a multi-front legal battle over the distribution of their digital files. In this particular case, they are insisting that…

Arkansas law requiring state contractors pledge not to boycott Israel has court challenge

Attorneys for an Arkansas newspaper asked a federal judge Friday to block a law requiring that contractors pledge not to boycott Israel, saying it forces businesses to give up their free speech rights in order to receive state money. U.S. District Judge Brian Miller heard arguments in the Arkansas Times’ lawsuit challenging the state’s 2017 anti-boycott law. Miller said he hoped to rule soon on whether to block the law, which the Times and the American Civil Liberties Union argue is unconstitutional. The law requires contractors to reduce their fees by 20 percent if they don’t sign the pledge. The…

Drag queen story hour lawsuit dismissed by judge

There was also a push for City Council to shut the program down, but Mayor Sylvester Turner noted Drag Queen Storytime is a voluntary program requested by patrons of two libraries that does not use city tax dollars. The lawsuit against “Drag Queen Storytime” at the Houston Public Library has been dismissed by a judge. It’s a monthly program that’s been popular at the Heights branch, where drag queens read to children between 18 months and 10 years old. The library had been facing a legal challenge to end the program since October. Opponents claimed the story hour violated the…

Doctor takes on FBI, ATF after being denied second amendment rights over his legal medical cannabis use

A Pennsylvania doctor with no criminal record was denied his right to own a firearm only because he possesses a legal medical cannabis card. Unable to properly defend himself, the 33-year-old doctor has filed a lawsuit against the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF). The case will impact millions of medical marijuana users and gun owners across the United States. Dr. Matthew Roman’s story began one afternoon in April of 2018. He and a friend were headed to a Philadelphia gun store named Firing Lane to shop for a pistol for home defense purposes. Dr.…

LA Is Suing The Weather Channel App For Selling Users’ Location Data

Here in L.A., we like to joke about the weather — how it’s cold at 65 degrees (IT IS), or how we may be a bit melodramatic in the case of rain. But there’s nothing particularly funny about the recent news that the Weather Channel app, which is owned by a subsidiary of IBM, has been selling users’ location data for profit to third-party companies without the users’ knowledge. In response, the L.A. City Attorney’s office has filed a lawsuit against TWC Products and Technology, LLC. Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer announced the lawsuit at a press conference Friday…

One of the most powerful and longest-serving City Council members in Chicago charged with extortion

One of the most powerful and longest-serving City Council members in Chicago history appeared in federal court Thursday on a charge that he tried to shake down a major fast-food restaurant chain seeking city remodeling permits. Alderman Ed Burke, 75, is charged with one count of attempted extortion for conveying to company executives in 2017 that they’d get the permits only if they signed on as clients at Burke’s private property-tax law firm in Chicago, a 37-page complaint unsealed on Thursday says. For many Chicagoans suspicious of dealings behind closed doors at City Hall, Burke has personified the city’s machine…

U.S. judge limits evidence in trial over Roundup cancer claims

A federal judge overseeing lawsuits alleging Bayer AG’s glyphosate-based weed killer causes cancer has issued a ruling that could severely restrict evidence that the plaintiffs consider crucial to their cases. U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria in San Francisco in an order on Thursday granted Bayer unit Monsanto’s request to split an upcoming trial into two phases. The order initially bars lawyers for plaintiff Edwin Hardeman from introducing evidence that the company allegedly attempted to influence regulators and manipulate public opinion. Thursday’s order applies to Hardeman’s case, which is scheduled to go to trial on Feb. 25, and two other so-called…

Federal Grand Jury Will Finally Hear Evidence Of A Controlled Demolition On 9/11

This year will mark the 19th anniversary of 9/11, a tragic event that will be remembered throughout history, and one that’s often considered responsible for the ‘waking up’ of millions of people. Though 9/11 was incredibly heartbreaking, it ultimately served a purpose, similar to how the false flag chemical attacks in Syria served a purpose. These events allowed so many people to become aware of all the lies and manipulation that occur within our government. They helped us understand the connections that the Western military alliance and intelligence agencies have with these so-called terrorist organizations, as many academics and politicians have directly accused the Western…

Spacey defiant, will plead not guilty in felony sex-crime case

Kevin Spacey must appear in person at his arraignment next week to face a felony sex-crime charge of groping a teenage boy in a Nantucket bar, a judge ruled Monday, the same day Spacey indicated he would plead not guilty. Spacey filed a motion Monday with the District Court on Nantucket Island seeking to be excused from appearing at the Jan. 7 arraignment, insisting that he didn’t need to be physically present to enter a plea. He also argued that the publicity surrounding his first public appearance since being accused last fall will likely taint the jury pool. But Judge Thomas Barrett…

Suspect’s Twitter messages played role in NSA hacking-tools leak probe

Hours before a 2016 leak of some of the National Security Agency’s most closely guarded hacking tools, a former NSA contractor sent a cryptic Twitter message that prompted alarm on the part of federal investigators, a federal judge has revealed. Messages that the former NSA computer security specialist, Hal Martin, sent via Twitter appear to have led to an FBI raid on his Maryland home and to his arrest on charges of retaining a vast trove of classified information there without permission, according to a newly released court ruling. Passages in the decision from U.S. District Court Judge Richard Bennett…

These Pennsylvania officials were jailed, convicted or arrested in 2018

Perjury. Bribery. Running pay-for-play operations out of city government offices. Offering favorable treatment in exchange for sex. These are just some of the activities employed by once-powerful public officials in Pennsylvania. They were given the public trust – along with enviable salaries and benefits – and abused their positions, prosecutors say. Here’s a look at public figures who ended up in Pennsylvania’s criminal justice system in 2018. A note: Most on this list have been convicted or pleaded guilty. A few individuals have been charged but their cases have not been resolved. Kathleen Kane The former Pennsylvania Attorney General, Kathleen…

1.7 million fools have signed a petition in favor of suing France over climate-change inaction

More than 1.7 million people have signed a petition in favor of suing the French government, accusing it of inaction on climate change. Four NGOs—Oxfam, Greenpeace, Notre Affaire à Tous, and Fondation pour la Nature et l’Homme—have initiated legal proceedings saying France has defaulted on its environmental obligations. The initial Dec.18 filing gives the government two months to formulate a response, after which the organizations can choose to move forward with their lawsuit (link in French) in administrative court. Marie Toussaint, president of Notre Affaire à Tous (In Our Common Interest), says the coalition is determined to get its day in court.…

Allison Mack gets restraining order on ‘obsessed fan,’ 53, seen lurking outside her parents’ home while she is on house arrest in NXIVM sex trafficking case

Former Smallville star Allison Mack has filed for a restraining order against a 53-year-old man, claiming that he has been stalking her while she is under house arrest in California on sex trafficking charges in connection to the NXIVM cult. A judge has granted the 36-year-old Mack an order of protection against Thomas Sekera, of Ohio. According to court documents obtained by the gossip site TMZ, Mack accused Sekera of lurking outside her parents’ home near Los Angeles, where she has been living and attending college since April, after being released from jail on $5million bail. Mack claimed that Sekera…

A retired Army 2-star is heading to trial on charges that he raped his daughter

In March, a military judge dismissed six rape charges against retired Maj. Gen. James Grazioplene, citing a new five-year statute of limitations prescribed by the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Now, he will face three charges of rape and three of incest at a civilian trial scheduled for late April, stemming from allegations he sexually assaulted his teenage daughter in the 1980s. Following the Army’s dismissal, authorities in Prince William County, Virginia ― a state with no statute of limitations on rape ― opened an investigation into Grazioplene, now 69. Though most of the alleged offenses, which took place from…

Virginia will no longer suspend driver’s licenses for unpaid court costs and fees

A federal judge has ordered Virginia to reinstate the licenses of drivers whom the state sought to punish for unpaid court fines. In the 23-page opinion Friday, U.S. District Judge Norman Moon called it likely that the state’s license-revocation scheme violates due-process rights. “While the court recognizes the commonwealth’s interest in ensuring the collection of court fines and costs, these interests are not furthered by a license suspension scheme that neither considers an individual’s ability to pay nor provides him with an opportunity to be heard on the matter,” Moon wrote, pairing his ruling with a preliminary injunction. More than…

Executives In Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Deserve 5-Year Prison Terms, Prosecutors Say

The former chairman and two vice presidents of the Tokyo Electric Power Co. should spend five years in prison over the 2011 flooding and meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, Japanese prosecutors say, accusing the executives of failing to prevent a foreseeable catastrophe. Prosecutors say the TEPCO executives didn’t do enough to protect the nuclear plant, despite being told in 2002 that the Fukushima facility was vulnerable to a tsunami. In March of 2011, it suffered meltdowns at three of its reactors, along with powerful hydrogen explosions. “It was easy to safeguard the plant against tsunami, but they kept…

2 Michigan regulators take plea deals in Flint water case

Two Michigan environmental regulators implicated in the Flint water scandal pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor Wednesday in exchange for more serious charges being dropped, bringing to six the number of officials who have agreed to such deals. Stephen Busch pleaded no contest to disturbing a public meeting, and Michael Prysby pleaded no contest to a count of violating Michigan’s Safe Drinking Water Act. They had been charged with felonies, but those charges and others were dismissed under the terms of their deals that also require them to testify against others, if needed. Two Michigan environmental regulators implicated in the…

Beginning Dec. 30 — yes, the day before New Year’s Eve Utah’s blood alcohol limit will drop to 0.05 percent, marking it the strictest DUI law in the country

In 1983, Utah was the first state to lower its blood alcohol limit from 0.10 to 0.08 for impaired driving. It would take nearly two decades for every state to follow suit, but as they did, the nation’s rate of alcohol-related traffic deaths dropped 10 percent. Now, Utah is pioneering the move to lower it once again. Beginning Dec. 30 — yes, the day before New Year’s Eve — Utahns will have to be extra careful about drinking and driving. On Sunday, the state’s blood alcohol content limit will drop from 0.08 percent to 0.05 percent, marking the strictest DUI…

Tennesse Court Rejects Sovereign Citizen DUI Defense…Second highest court in Tennessee rejects argument that drunk driving refusal charge violates religious liberty

The Tennessee Court of Appeals on Friday rejected the creative arguments of a man who tried to get out of a drunk driving conviction by claiming his arrest violated his religious liberty. Christopher Bernard Simmons was picked up for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) on September 15, 2013, after he was involved in a car crash in Nashville. Simmons had refused to take any tests or answer any questions related to the incident. When asked if he understood not taking a breathalyzer or blood test would result in a refusal charge, Simmons repeated the same response. “With all…