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Millions Hear Mysterious Global Hum That Has Scientists Stumped

A mysterious global hum is baffling scientists and millions of people around the world.

In fact, 4% of the world’s population, or roughly 308 million people, can hear the mysterious global hum, The Guardian claims. Specifically, 308 million is 4% of the current global population of 7.691 billion. However, nobody including scientists knows what causes the hum.

To clarify, the mysterious global hum is a sound similar to “an endless riff of heavy metal music” or whirring that people hear. Moreover, some people claim to have heard the worldwide hum since the 1960s or 1970s.

City Hears Mysterious Global Hum For Six Years

Strangely, people hear the hum all over the world. For instance, on Alaska’s Chichagof Island, in Sydney, Australia, as well as in London and Cheshire, England.

In addition, the mysterious global hum plagued residents of Windsor, Ontario (across from Detroit) for six years, The Guardian reports. Specifically, Windsor residents describe the hum as part noise and part vibration. Strangely, some Windsor residents compare the hum to the noise the Starship Enterprise makes as it prepares for Warp speed.

“You can’t get away from it,” Windsor resident Mike Provost tells The Guardian. “You go outside to work in your garden, you go outside to enjoy the sun, the noise is there.”

In detail, Windsor residents first heard the hum in 2010 and were still reporting it in 2016. However, Canadian scientists blame the hum on a U.S. Steel plant and other industrial facilities on Zug Island in the Detroit River. To elaborate, the scientists think industrial machines make the hum.

What Causes The Mysterious Global Hum?

On the other hand, industrial machines are not causing the mysterious global hum in places like Chichagof Island and London.

Presently, explanations for the hum range from tinnitus to lighting, to meteors, to the ocean, to electromagnetic energy, to volcanoes, to stress, to submarines, to noise pollution, to space aliens, The Guardian reports. Nevertheless, there is no hard evidence to verify any of those explanations.

“The bulk of the evidence suggests that the Hum is not an acoustic sound,” geoscientist David Deming says. “This is indicated by the simple fact that most people do not hear it.”

Mysterious Global Hum Baffles Scientists

Significantly, Deming has been investigating the hum since 2004 and found no causes. Notably, Deming‘s research began after hearing the hum himself.

Notwithstanding, Deming believes electromagnetic energy from low-frequency radio signals causes the mysterious global hum. Particularly, navies use such signals to communicate with submarines at sea.

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