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Is Child Protective Services Trafficking Children?

Newsweek recently ran an article by Michael Dolce called “We Have Set Up a System to Sex Traffic American Kids,” in which he dropped staggering statistics that should make American parents take action.

Here’s the ugly truth: most Americans who are victims of sex trafficking come from our nation’s own foster care system. It’s a deeply broken system that leaves  thousands vulnerable to pimps as children and grooms them for the illegal sex trade as young adults…Most people don’t know about our nation’s foster care to sex trafficking pipeline, but the facts are sobering. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) found that “of the more than 18,500 endangered runaways reported to NCMEC in 2016,  one in six were likely victims of child sex trafficking. Of those, 86 percent were in the care of social services when they went missing.

The outcomes of law enforcement efforts against sex traffickers repeatedly support the NCMEC estimate. In a 2013 FBI 70-city nationwide raid, 60 percent of the victims came from foster care or group homes. In 2014, New York authorities estimated that 85 percent of sex trafficking victims were previously in the child welfare system.

In 2012, Connecticut police rescued 88 children from sex trafficking; 86 were from the child welfare system. And even more alarming: the FBI discovered in a 2014 nationwide raid that many foster children rescued from sex traffickers, including children as young as 11, were never reported missing by child welfare authorities.

In Kansas, the number of missing foster children prompted a class-action lawsuit this past November. Local Wichita press reported the heinous claims:

On Friday, a class-action lawsuit was filed in federal court against Gov. Jeff Colyer and Gina Meier-Hummel, secretary of the state’s child welfare system, along with officials of two other agencies, claiming children in the Kansas foster care system have been treated so poorly that they’ve suffered mentally or fled from foster homes. In some cases, they have been trafficked for sex, sexually abused inside adoptive homes or in one instance reportedly raped inside a child welfare office, the suit says.

Kansas authorities have only been able to recover 18 of the 81 missing children in the foster system. Interestingly, the effort to find the missing children did not get started until after the lawsuit was filed, according to the Wichita Eagle. According to the numbers, all 50 states have similar problems.
Now deceased Georgia Senator Nancy Schaefer wrote extensively on the CPS abuse and corruption and fought hard while she was alive to bring awareness to the sex trafficking happening through corrupt government institutions. Schaefer was a leading voice against CPS and discovered many abuses until she was murdered in what authorities say was a murder suicide committed by her husband. Many people who work in the same field of uncovering CPS abuse do not believe the official findings. The news coverage of her death never even mentioned her life’s work, which was exposing the financial corruption of the state child welfare system that takes children away from imperfect and often poor but loving homes in exchange for federal dollars.

In 2007, Nancy Schaefer wrote a report to the Georgia Assembly that detailed the abuses she uncovered:

In this report, I am focusing on the Georgia Department of Family and Children Services (DFCS). However, I believe Child Protective Services nationwide has become corrupt and that the entire system is broken almost beyond repair. I am convinced parents and families should be warned of the dangers.

The Department of Child Protective Services, known as the Department of Family and Children Service (DFCS) in Georgia and other titles in other states, has become a “protected empire” built on taking children and separating families. This is not to say that there are not those children who do need to be removed from wretched situations and need protection. This report is concerned with the children and parents caught up in “legal kidnapping,” ineffective policies, and DFCS who do does not remove a child or children when a child is enduring torment and abuse. (See Exhibit A and Exhibit B)

The report is riveting and must be read in its entirety, but some of the most damaging information she revealed included that CPS is a for-profit business that depends on the removal of children in order to get paid.

The Adoption and the Safe Families Act, set in motion by President Bill Clinton, offered cash “bonuses” to the states for every child they adopted out of foster care. In order to receive the “adoption incentive bonuses” local child protective services need more children. They must have merchandise (children) that sell and you must have plenty of them so the buyer can choose. Some counties are known to give a $4,000 bonus for each child adopted and an additional $2,000 for a “special needs” child. Employees work to keep the federal dollars flowing;

• that there is double dipping. The funding continues as long as the child is out of the home. When a child in foster care is placed with a new family then “adoption bonus funds” are available. When a child is placed in a mental health facility and is on 16 drugs per day, like two children of a constituent of mine, more funds are involved;

• that there are no financial resources and no real drive to unite a family and help keep them together;

CONTINUE @ PJ MEDIA

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